It is NOT in the Constitution
By Mr. David Zanotti

Cloture is the term. The rule began in 1917 in the US Senate in the era of Woodrow Wilson. The idea of ending a filibuster in the Senate with a supermajority of 60 votes has turned into a blockade, regardless of who is in power or which Party is running the show. Requiring a super-majority on ANY vote that is not specifically called for in the U.S. Constitution is a dangerous precedent because it strips the voters of the power of representation. Our system is based upon majority rule. Our laws carry authority because they are built upon the consent of the majority with this in mind; we have a Bill of Rights that prevents Congress from passing laws that would abrogate the civil rights of the minority. 

Cloture, or requiring 60 votes to bring a measure to a vote in the Senate enables any minority of ANY party the power to stop the majority consensus of the duly elected members of the Senate. Thus the people are defrauded of their representation. The people can elect a majority of Senators representing ANY majority opinion on ANY issue and the minority in the Senate can block, delay or stop the rule of law based upon majority consent. 

If cloture was such a good idea, why did the Framers not include it in Article One of the U.S. Constitution in the first place? The intense labor, fierce debate and deft compromises that all were part of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 did NOT include the concept of cloture or any artificial super-majority votes in the Senate. Get rid of it. The sooner the better. 

 

Posted: April 05, 2017, 08:58 PM

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